Rainbow Scarab Beetle

Phaneus vindex small

This colorful lil Rainbow Scarab is a Dung Beetle. Latin name Phaneus vindex.  I’ve been fortunate enough to witness these guys in action on numerous occasions. I’ll never forget the first time I saw one. I was outside in North Florida with my dog, who ah, welll. . . had just created a small dung pile.  Within minutes I heard a loud buzzing (like a very loud bee).  I looked, and to my surprise I saw this shiny, huge beetle buzz right by us and land on the dung pile.  She was so vibrant and shiny green that I just had to watch as this beautiful beetle effortlessly pulled that log of dung down under the soil within seconds, leaving only what looked like an ant hill.  I later learned that she lays her eggs on the excrement where the larva eventually will feed on it until they eclose (hatch) into a full size beetle.  Cool eh!?

Painted with Liquitex acrylics, detailed with Prismacolor colored pencils

 

 

An Exotic Long-Armed Scarab Beetle (Euchirus longimanus)

Euchirus longimanus (small)

One might notice that among the insects I paint I clearly favor the beetle (order – coleoptera).  It’s actually a pretty common favoritism among entomologists and insect enthusiasts.  A famous biologist/naturalist, JBS Haldane once surmised that the Creator must be inordinately fond of beetles.  That said, I offer you a few tidbits about the beetle: The earth is home to easily 350,000+ different species of beetle.  Beetles are a diverse group of insects and inhabit nearly every ecological niche on the planet.  Most can fly and typically have four wings.  The outer two wings are hardened (elytra) and serve as a body cover to protect the flying wings and the abdomen. Beetles begin their life as an egg which hatch into a larvae or grub that goes through a metamorphosis which turns this worm-like creature into an adult with six legs and four wings.  New species are still being discovered regularly.
Exotic beetles are such a fascination in Europe and Japan that they are collected much like coins or stamps. Some enthusiasts often breed them.

This Euchirus longimanus  painting was created using Liquitex acrylic paints, and Prismacolor pencils.

Euchirinae subfamily of the Scarabs is found from Turkey to the Himalayas through much of Indonesia. This subfamily is characterized by the males having very long front legs with a few spines and is from Indonesia.  The females have normal length front legs.

A Couple of Scarab Beetles


These two beetles are both members of the Scarabaeidae (Scarab) family.  Painted them some years ago in an old sketchbook of mine.  Eudicella gralli and Jumnos ruckeri